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 HOW DOES IT WORK?
The Mylar reed is flared on the other end to increase the air mass within the device. This provides acoustic impedance. When the device is being used, the Mylar reed will oscillate at a frequency that matches the resonance frequency of pulmonary secretions (16-25Hz).
 
Thus, the viscosity of these secretions is reduced by mechanical vibrations resulting from the sound waves.
 
Additionally, these vibrations will also facilitate the action of the mucociliary escalator system, which will mobilize the loose and thin liquid jelly or mucus, to ensure optimal bronchial hygiene by easier and more effective expectoration.

INSTRUCTIONS

The following steps will ensure the correct use of the device:

  • First, perform a deep inhalation. Then, place lips around the mouthpiece. Exhale forcefully through the Lung Flute® as if trying to blow out a candle. After that, remove the mouthpiece and quickly inhale again. Now, put the mouthpiece back in the mouth, and blow gently through the Lung Flute.

  • Remove the mouthpiece again and wait 5 seconds, taking several normal breaths.

  • For best results, blow into the Lung Flute® for up to 20 sets of two blows per set. (Begin slowly and build up the number of repetitions over time.)

  • Approximately 5 minutes after the session has ended, mucus will have collected at the back of the throat and vigorous coughing may occur. Thinned mucus may collect at the back of the throat for several hours after the session, which is normal. A drink of water will wash away the mucus and prevent minor throat irritation.

CLINICAL STUDIES

Dentist Appointment

II - Diagnostic Clinical Trials

2016 - Efficiency of the Lung Flute for sputum induction in patients with presumed pulmonary tuberculosis (pdf)
Department of Respiratory Medicine. Tokyo Metropolitan Tama Medical Center. Tokyo, Japan.

 

2013 - Evaluation of Lung Flute in Sputum Samples for Molecular Analysis of Lung Cancer (pdf)
Department of Pathology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland

 

2013 - Use of the Lung Flute in Sputum Induction in Children with Cystic Fibrosis - a Pilot Study (pdf)
University of New South Wales Cystic Fibrosis Clinic, Sydney Children's Hospital, Randwick, Australia

 

2009 - Novel method for sputum induction using the Lung Flute in patients with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis (pdf)
Official Journal of the Asian Pacific Society of Respirology, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Tokyo Metropolitan Fuchu Hospital, Tokyo, Japan

 

2008 - A small audio device may be alternative to hypertonic saline inhalation for sputum induction in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (pdf)
Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Tokyo Metropolitan Fuchu Hospital, Tokyo, Japan

 

2005 - Efficacy and safety of a new acoustic device, the Lung Flute, for sputum induction in healthy non-smokers and chronic bronchitis (pdf)
School of Medicine, University at Buffalo/VA Western NY Healthcare System

 

2004 - Safety and efficacy of sputum induction with the Lung Flute compared with sputum induction with hypertonic saline and saliva (pdf)
School of Medicine, University at Buffalo/VA Western NY Healthcare System